Namibia is an upper middle-income country with one of the most comprehensive social protection systems in Africa. It provides cash transfers and complementary social assistance to a range of vulnerable groups including children, the elderly and people with disabilities, at a cost equivalent to 4.5% of GDP in 2016/17. Public-sector workers are well covered by social insurance, although there are gaps in provision for the private sector.

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Viet Nam has made significant progress in expanding social insurance coverage in recent years. However, coverage amongst small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) remains very low and very few workers in this sector are expected to receive a pension in retirement. Drawing on two datasets for SMEs in Viet Nam, this paper seeks to explain this phenomenon by examining the characteristics of enterprises that are enrolled and those that opt out, and it identifies possible barriers to enrolment, such as high contribution rates.

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This paper assesses the effects on poverty and inequality of the alternative targeting approaches that Zambia’s Social Cash Transfer programme could take as its expansion continues during the period of the country’s Seventh National Development Plan (2017–21). It further assesses the domestic financing needs associated with alternative approaches. The Zambian government introduced support based on giving actual cash through social cash transfers aimed at reducing poverty and vulnerability in a sustainable and cost-effective way.

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Join us for our CSW63 side event on Wednesday March 13th at UN Women, NYC.

Space is limited, please RSVP no later than 11 March to Yemarshet Sissay yemarshet.sissay@unwomen.org

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Children’s Right to Social Protection in the Middle East and North Africa: An analysis of legal frameworks from a child-rights perspective

This brief explores the Asian Development Bank's (ADB) Technical Assistance (TA) Social Protection Sector Development Program in Indonesia, which aimed at supporting government efforts in alleviating the socioeconomic distress caused by the 1997 Asian economic crisis, while launching sector reforms to strengthen social services delivery.

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The methods used to identify beneficiaries of programmes aiming to address persistent poverty and shocks are subject to frequent policy debates. Relying on panel data from Niger, this paper analyses the performance of different targeting methods that are widely used by development and humanitarian actors and explores how they can be applied as part of an adaptive social protection (ASP) system. The methods include proxy-means testing (PMT), household economy analysis (HEA), geographical targeting, and combined methods.

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This is the final research report of a project to investigate the potential of social accountability in the social protection sector for improving service delivery and state-society relations. The report brings together a review of the global literature with findings from four country case studies: Ethiopia, India, Nepal, South Africa.

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This study provides a rationale for building linkages between social protection and sustainable forestry in developing countries through: the development of a conceptual framework for understanding the two-way relationship between social protection instruments and forestry policies; a review of evidence of the role of forestry policies in reducing vulnerabilities and fostering livelihoods among forest-dependent people; a review of the evidence of the impact of social protection instruments on the resilience of forest-dependent people and on the promotion of sustainable forest management; an

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Agricultural transformation to reduce poverty and hunger: An innovative approach