Programme objectives

To achieve food security by providing public primary school students with one hot meal per day, usually procured from local farmers

References
Afoakwa, E.O. n.d. “Home Grown School Feeding Programme – The Ghanaian Model as Icon for Africa.” Accra: University of Ghana, Legon. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.gcnf.org/library/Ghana-School-Feeding-Programme-Overview-and-Progress.pdf>.
Country
Geographic area
Previous programme name (if any)
 
Start date
2005
References
Afoakwa, E.O. n.d. “Home Grown School Feeding Programme – The Ghanaian Model as Icon for Africa.” Accra: University of Ghana, Legon. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.gcnf.org/library/Ghana-School-Feeding-Programme-Overview-and-Progress.pdf>. World Bank. 2016 (forthcoming). Ghana: Social Protection Assessment and Expenditure Review. Washington, DC: World Bank.
Programme components
GSFP is one of Ghana’s strategies for achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) on hunger, poverty and primary education.
References
Afoakwa, E.O. n.d. “Home Grown School Feeding Programme – The Ghanaian Model as Icon for Africa.” Accra: University of Ghana, Legon. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.gcnf.org/library/Ghana-School-Feeding-Programme-Overview-and-Progress.pdf>.
Conditionalities (if any)
School attendance
Contribution type and amount
 
Targeting methods
Categorical Targeting
Targeted areas
Nationwide
Target groups
Children
Eligibility criteria
Enrolment in public pre-primary and primary schools and school attendance.
References
World Bank. 2016 (forthcoming). Ghana: Social Protection Assessment and Expenditure Review. Washington, DC: World Bank.
Eligibility reassessment (if any)
 
Type of benefits
Food
Amount of benefits
One hot meal made from locally produced foodstuffs.
References
World Bank. 2016 (forthcoming). Ghana: Social Protection Assessment and Expenditure Review. Washington, DC: World Bank.
Payment/delivery frequency
Daily
References
World Bank. 2016 (forthcoming). Ghana: Social Protection Assessment and Expenditure Review. Washington, DC: World Bank.
Benefit delivery mechanism
Meals are delivered at schools.
Benefit recipients
Public school children
Minimum and maximum duration of benefits (if any)
Meals are distributed daily throughout the school year.
References
World Bank. 2016 (forthcoming). Ghana: Social Protection Assessment and Expenditure Review. Washington, DC: World Bank.
Coverage
1.7 million children—39 per cent of students registered in public pre-primary and primary schools (2014).
References
World Bank. 2016 (forthcoming). Ghana: Social Protection Assessment and Expenditure Review. Washington, DC: World Bank.
Programme expenditure
GHS165 million (2014)
References
World Bank. 2016 (forthcoming). Ghana: Social Protection Assessment and Expenditure Review. Washington, DC: World Bank.
Institutions and agencies involved
Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development; Ministry of Food and Agriculture; Ministry of Finance; Ministry of Health; Ministry of Women and Children’s Affairs; Ministry of Education; Ghana Education Service; World Food Programme (WFP); Government of the Netherlands.
References
Afoakwa, E.O. n.d. “Home Grown School Feeding Programme – The Ghanaian Model as Icon for Africa.” Accra: University of Ghana, Legon. Accessed 11 November 2015. <http://www.gcnf.org/library/Ghana-School-Feeding-Programme-Overview-and-Progress.pdf>.
Monitoring and evaluation mechanisms and frequency
 
Legal Framework
 
MIS
 
Stakeholder
Population Group
Children