Last updated: 07/8/2020
Programme objectives

By lowering the enrolment cost barrier through effective targeting, the Government of Indonesia hopes to tackle the low enrolment rates and high dropout probabilities of poor students and eliminate the education gap (World Bank, 2012). PIP also helps the government meet its constitutional guarantees by providing incentives for all children to complete at least a 9-year basic education

References
World Bank. 2017. Indonesia Social Assistance Public Expenditure Review Update: Towards a comprehensive, integrated, and effective social assistance system in Indonesia. Jakarta: World Bank. <http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/535721509957076661/pdf/120905-REVISED-PUBLIC-Screen-English-1211-update.pdf>. Accessed 02 August 2018.
Country
Geographic area
Previous programme name (if any)
Program Bantuan Siswa Miskin (BSM)—Cash Transfer Programme for Poor Students
Institutions and agencies involved
Start date
2008
References
Larasaty, Dyah, and Howell Fiona. 2014. “Bantuan Siswa Miskin (BSM): Indonesian Cash Transfer Programme for Poor Students” IPC-IG Research Brief No. 46. Brasília: International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth. Australian Aid. 2016. Education Partnership—Independent Completion Report (ICR). <http://dfat.gov.au/about-us/publications/Documents/indonesia-education-partnership-completion-report.pdf>. Accessed 11 May 2018.
Programme components
Conditionalities (if any)
School enrolment and attendance
Contribution type and amount
 
Targeting methods
Proxy Means Test
Categorical Targeting
Targeted areas
Nationwide
Target groups
Children and youth
Eligibility criteria
School-age children (from 6 to 21 years of age) in families benefitting from social assistance programmes (KPS cardholders, former BSM beneficiaries, PKH beneficiaries), as well as those living in orphanages or who are not going to school or who have dropped out. Eligibility is verified by schools
References
World Bank. 2017. Indonesia Social Assistance Public Expenditure Review Update: Towards a comprehensive, integrated, and effective social assistance system in Indonesia. Jakarta: World Bank. <http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/535721509957076661/pdf/120905-REVISED-PUBLIC-Screen-English-1211-update.pdf>. Accessed 02 August 2018.
Eligibility reassessment (if any)
 
Type of benefits
Cash
Amount of benefits
The annual value of the transfer varies by educational level: IDR450,000 (USD35)—primary school; IDR750,000 (USD58)—junior secondary; IDR1million (USD77)—senior secondary level
References
World Bank. 2017. Indonesia Social Assistance Public Expenditure Review Update: Towards a comprehensive, integrated, and effective social assistance system in Indonesia. Jakarta: World Bank. <http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/535721509957076661/pdf/120905-REVISED-PUBLIC-Screen-English-1211-update.pdf>. Accessed 02 August 2018.
Payment/delivery frequency
Transfers are distributed between August and September and between March and April in the following calendar year
References
World Bank. 2017. Indonesia Social Assistance Public Expenditure Review Update: Towards a comprehensive, integrated, and effective social assistance system in Indonesia. Jakarta: World Bank. <http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/535721509957076661/pdf/120905-REVISED-PUBLIC-Screen-English-1211-update.pdf>. Accessed 02 August 2018.
Benefit delivery mechanism
The list of beneficiaries is announced via decree by both ministries in charge of the programme, who send the recipient list to distric-level educational offices and to the payment institutions: the BNI and BRI banks. Disbursement times and locations are then sent to schools, who notify students or their parents. At the moment, funds are released in cash, but in the future benefits should be disbursed via banks and post offices
References
World Bank. 2017. Indonesia Social Assistance Public Expenditure Review Update: Towards a comprehensive, integrated, and effective social assistance system in Indonesia. Jakarta: World Bank. <http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/535721509957076661/pdf/120905-REVISED-PUBLIC-Screen-English-1211-update.pdf>. Accessed 02 August 2018.
Benefit recipients
Students or parents/caregivers
References
World Bank. 2017. Indonesia Social Assistance Public Expenditure Review Update: Towards a comprehensive, integrated, and effective social assistance system in Indonesia. Jakarta: World Bank. <http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/535721509957076661/pdf/120905-REVISED-PUBLIC-Screen-English-1211-update.pdf>. Accessed 02 August 2018.
Minimum and maximum duration of benefits (if any)
Benefits last for the duration of the child’s schooling
References
World Bank. 2017. Indonesia Social Assistance Public Expenditure Review Update: Towards a comprehensive, integrated, and effective social assistance system in Indonesia. Jakarta: World Bank. <http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/535721509957076661/pdf/120905-REVISED-PUBLIC-Screen-English-1211-update.pdf>. Accessed 02 August 2018.
Coverage
The benefit reached 20.4 million children (6-21 years of age) in 2015, which corresponds to 28 percent of the age group The programme reached 19.5 million students in 2016
References
World Bank. 2017. Indonesia Social Assistance Public Expenditure Review Update: Towards a comprehensive, integrated, and effective social assistance system in Indonesia. Jakarta: World Bank. <http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/535721509957076661/pdf/120905-REVISED-PUBLIC-Screen-English-1211-update.pdf>. Accessed 02 August 2018. BAPPENAS, and UNICEF. 2017. SDG Baseline Report on Children in Indonesia’. <https://www.unicef.org/indonesia/SDG_Baseline_Report_on_Children_in_Indonesia(1).pdf>. Accessed 11 May 2018.
Programme expenditure
IDR10.5 trillion (2016)
References
World Bank. 2017. Indonesia Social Assistance Public Expenditure Review Update: Towards a comprehensive, integrated, and effective social assistance system in Indonesia. Jakarta: World Bank. <http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/535721509957076661/pdf/120905-REVISED-PUBLIC-Screen-English-1211-update.pdf>. Accessed 02 August 2018.
Monitoring and evaluation mechanisms and frequency
PIP management is carried out independently by several directorates. Internal programme monitoring (on beneficiary selection, transfer disbursements and withdrawal) is thus carried out jointly with provincial and district offices. School attendance is not monitored and no defined monitoring and evaluation procedure feeds back into programme improvement
References
World Bank. 2017. Indonesia Social Assistance Public Expenditure Review Update: Towards a comprehensive, integrated, and effective social assistance system in Indonesia. Jakarta: World Bank. <http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/535721509957076661/pdf/120905-REVISED-PUBLIC-Screen-English-1211-update.pdf>. Accessed 02 August 2018.
Legal Framework
 
MIS
 
Population Group